Aeglaeca

According to Klaeber's glossary, "aglæc-wif" translates as: "wretch, or monster of a woman." Klaeber's glossary also defines "aglæca/æglæca" as "monster, demon, fiend" when referring to Grendel or Grendel's mother and as "warrior, hero" when referring to the character Beowulf. [Wikipedia]

My NaNoWriMo Stats

all the small gods

One of my favorite book quotes and something I wholeheartedly believe. From “Small Gods” by the eternally fantastic Sir Terry Pratchett:

There are billions of gods in the world. They swarm as thick as herring roe. Most of them are too small to see and never get worshiped, at least by anything bigger than a bacteria, who never say their prayers and don’t demand much in the way of miracles.
They are the small gods — the spirits of places where two ant trails cross, the gods of micro-climates down between the grass roots. And most of them stay that way.
Because what they lack is belief.
A handful though, go on to greater things. Anything may trigger it. A shepherd, seeking a lost lamb, finds it among the briars and takes a minute or two to build a small cairn of stones in general thanks to whatever spirit might be around the place. Or a peculiarly shaped tree becomes associated with a cure for disease. Or someone carves a spiral on an isolated stone. Because what gods need is belief, and what humans want is gods.
Often it stops there, But sometimes it goes further. More rocks are added, more stones are raised, a temple is built on the site where the tree once stood. The god grows in strength, the belief of its worshipers raising it upwards like a thousand tons of rocket fuel. For a very few, the sky’s the limit.
And, sometimes, not even that.

By this description I am a small god… I only have a few self-created worshipers! (my children) lol

Silo Trilogy by Hugh Howey

Book Review of Wool, Shift, & Dust by Hugh Howey

These books were originally published in multiple parts each, what I am reviewing here are the omnibus editions.  All three books are telling essentially the same story with Shift picking up the tale I’d say about the middle of the Wool timeline and then Dust taking the story to it’s conclusion.  Even though the story and timelines cross-over they are told from different perspectives.  Howey’s writing style is easy to read and follow — I’ve not read any of his other books (though I now plan too) but at least in these there are no impossible made-up words or ideas to contend with.  Not suggesting those are always bad things but they do sometimes make a book harder to enjoy.  In my initial review of ‘Wool’ I had said that I thought Mr. Howey had a chip on his shoulder with his Help Desk people since he essentially criminalized the ‘IT’ department.  I’m so glad that I read the other two books so I could get the rest of the story!  Since I don’t want to give everything away I will say that the basic premise throughout the story of a dystopian society created by a corrupt government via the catalyst of an eminent biological attack is completely (and sadly) believable.   Juliette, whom I will call our protagonist (though not the only one) is a real and likable woman – a person you will be rooting for until the bitter end.  I guess the main antagonist is Thurman, but he is really just the linchpin of a much bigger evil.  I kind of wanted a 4th book to continue the story but I guess I will have to be happy with the ending as it is – and it does have a happy ending even though there are losses along the way.  (I will have to  be satisfied imagining for myself what happened next… like who married whom, who got be the next mayor, if they found others… etc.).  I absolutely recommend these books!  It’s an enjoyable way to spend a weekend or two!

The pie must die!

cherrypie

You are evil pie!  You want me to have high blood sugar and an out of control BMI….

You will be punished… by my eating you promptly so I don’t have to look at your evilness!!!

EVIL PIE

*this is what sitting at a desk all day talking to yourself can do to a person, so watch out kids!!
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"There are so many little dyings. How do we know which one of them is death?" ~Kenneth Patchen~